Think Indigenous EP#2 - Crystal Lameman

"WHEN DID IT BECOME OKAY FOR INDUSTRY TO BE WELCOMED INTO OUR CLASSROOMS? THEY'RE ASSISTING IN THE DESIGN OF CURRICULUM? SIT WITH THAT A LITTLE WHILE, WHILE THINKING ABOUT YOUR ROOTS." -CRYSTAL LAMEMAN

In this episode of the Think Indigenous Podcast we hear the presentation of Crystal Lameman (Beaver Lake Cree Nation). In this presentation, Crystal connects the abuse of our lands & waters to the types of education our Youth are receiving - in what way are our Indigenous ways of knowing & being being practiced today? How can we access our traditional knowledge systems if we can't access our homelands & territories? When no land is left - what use are our traditional knowledge systems?


CRYSTAL LAMEMAN BIO

Crystal Lameman is a member of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation, Treaty No. 6, Alberta. She is the Climate and Energy Campaigner for Sierra Club Canada and is a fellow of the Indigenous Environmental Network. Crystal uses her formal academia (two university degrees) but most importantly her Indigenous ways of knowing and being to articulate the damaging impacts of industrialization and resource extraction on her homelands. Beaver Lake Cree Nation launched legal action in 2008 aimed at protecting their traditional lands and treaty rights. Lameman cites this action as an example of how First Nations people can assert their rights while offering a solution.

The language and curricula around the education of our children has changed drastically and it is time that we begin having these conversations openly and honestly with our children. It is time that we make a commitment as educators to consolidating our efforts, and stand strong in the opposition of the agreements forged without our knowledge, participation, and consent. First Nations people, in our engagement with development are now having to force the assertion of our inherent right to self determination, self determined and sustainable development, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and other declarations on our collective rights as Indigenous peoples. It is our responsibility to make the use of this language common for our children.

It is time to have that conversation around the collective control of our natural resources based on the principles of people’s participation, gender equality, environmental and social justice, self reliant and sustainable management systems while maintaining natural law and the assertion of our sovereignty over our lands and resources. The shift to the focus on development rooted in our systems of natural law, and not on the capitalist development, respecting mother earth and that includes viable solutions as opposed to false solutions to climate change.

Our children should understand what it means when we talk about demanding and asserting Green economies defined by us that put a stop to the capitalism of Mother Nature; thus pushing systems that reject the current system and recognizes our traditional economies and governance.


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